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Solar Eclipses: Home

This guide provides the resources, both print and online, for the recreational and safe viewing of solar eclipses. Browse the resources below or check the shelves at your Delaware Public Library in the following area: 523.78

Solar Eclipses Across America

Two major solar eclipses are coming to North America! On Saturday, October 14, 2023, an annular ("ring of fire") eclipse sweeps from Oregon to Texas in a 125-mile-wide path that continues to the Yucatán peninsula and northern South America. Six months later, on Monday, April 8, 2024, a total solar eclipse darkens a 115-mile-wide swath from Mexico to the Canadian maritimes, traversing the U.S. from Texas to Maine in the process. In both cases all of North America will have at least a partial solar eclipse.

What is a Solar Eclipse?

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between Earth and the sun, and the moon casts a shadow over Earth. 

There are four types of solar eclipses:

  • Total solar eclipses
  • Partial solar eclipses
  • Annular solar eclipses
  • Hybrid solar eclipses

Federal Agency Resources

Solar Eclipse 101

Find it in the Catalog